Beware The Embellisher

March 22, 2014

An Embellisher is an individual who, in a social setting, will recount a personal story concerning an event that occurred in their life which contains a percentage fiction.  The Embellisher, however, should not be confused with the Compulsive Liar, whose stories are one hundred per cent pure fiction.

The Embellisher can be categorized under three approximate levels:

The Social Embellisher:  75% true, 25% fiction.

The Chronic Embellisher:  50% true, 50% fiction.

The Sociopath Embellisher:  25% true, 75% fiction.

The degree to which an individual is an Embellisher must be assessed on a story-by-story basis.  Any Embellisher can range from the mild to the extreme.

Most Embellishers learn their craft from either a parent (or both) or from a close association with a long-term friend.

Recognizing an Embellisher is relatively simple.  Embellishers will use words or phrases that are highly exaggerative.  For example:  “Everybody cracked up laughing at something I said.”  The Embellisher is always within the confines of their story the center or focal point of positive attention.  The more exaggerated the story becomes, the greater the level of fiction.

An Embellisher will rarely, if ever, recount a story in which they are viewed negatively.  An Embellisher’s goal is self-promotion.

The Embellisher will also increase the amount of fiction within a given story each time they retell that story.  They will also recount stories that are not socially appropriate.  Stories that are sexual in nature, although not explicit, are a favorite of the Embellisher in mixed company, since these stories tend to elicit a strong attention response.

Within the realm of a social gathering, where someone will tell a story about something that happened to them, the Embellisher will immediately interject with an even wilder, more fantastic tale in order to gain the group’s attention.

Embellishers for the most part are harmless to others.  But just like The Boy Who Cried Wolf, once an Embellisher has been identified by their social peers trust issues arise.  It’s the same as knowing how a magician performs his greatest trick.  The illusion is gone.  Now it becomes a daunting task of sorting out the facts from the fiction.

It takes a very strong-willed individual to be in a committed, loving relationship with an Embellisher.

Under no circumstances should you confront an Embellisher.  You have two options:  Ignore their embellishments completely or just smile and go along with their charade.

Is Plagiarism the New Online Journalism?

June 29, 2013

I’ve noticed a very disturbing trend while searching Google News for Linux information.  A pattern of rewritten articles emerged.  The same information that was posted previously on one Website appeared at regular and consistent intervals in stories re-reported by another author on a completely different Website.

These cloned articles may be nothing more than coincidence.  However, the frequency at which these stories are published makes me extremely skeptical.

Google does not lie.  It can only return search results based on the information it receives from a Website.  So all dates listed are accurate.

The inclusion of the description “(blog)” is deceptive.  No blog section can be currently found on the Website cited.  All of these articles appeared as a featured news story on their home page.

The Evidence:

Example one – Same story, one day later.

1 day later example 1

Example two – Same story, one day later.

1 day later example 2

Example three – Same story, one day later.

1 day later example 3

Example four – Same story, one day later.

1 day later example 4

Example five – Same story, one day later.

1 day later example 5

Example six – Same story, one day later.

1 day later example 6

Example seven – Same story, two days later.

2 days later example 1

Example eight – Same story, two days later.

2 days later example 2

Example nine – Same story, two days later.

2 days later example 3

Example ten – Same story, two days later.

2 days later example 4 part 1

2 days later example 4 part 2

Example eleven – Same story, two days later.

2 days later example 5 part 1

2 days later example 5 part 2

Example twelve – Same story, four days later.

4 days later example 1

Example thirteen – Same story, four days later.

4 days later example 2 part 1

4 days later example 2 part 2

Example fourteen – Same story, six days later.

6 days later example 1

Example fifteen – Same story, six days later.

6 days later example 2

Example sixteen – Same story, seven days later.

7 days later

Example seventeen – Same story, nine days later.

9 days later

Example eighteen – Quoting the same blogger five times in less than one month.

Quoting one blogger 5 times in less than one month

Example nineteen – Quoting another blogger five times in less than one month.

Quoting one blogger 5 times in less than one month

Example twenty – Quoting another blogger four times in less than one month.

Quoting another blogger 4 times in less than one month

Example twenty-one – Quoting another blogger four times in less than one month.

Quoting another blogger 4 times in less than one monthExample twenty-two – Quoting another blogger four times in less than one month.

Quoting another blogger 4 times in less than one month

Example twenty-three – Quoting another blogger three times in less than one month.

Quoting another blogger 3 times in less than one month

Example twenty-four – Quoting another blogger three times in less than one month.

Quoting another blogger 3 times in less than one month

Example twenty-five – Quoting another blogger three times in less than one month.

Quoting another blogger 3 times in less than one month

Example twenty-six – Quoting another blogger four times in less than one month.

Quoting another blogger 4 times in less than one month

Anyone can sit on their ass and surf the Web.  They can collect and rewrite information to their heart’s content.  They can even submit those copy-cat articles for publication on a major news Website.  But is that really journalism?

Has plagiarism become the new standard of online journalism?

There is the evidence.

You decide.

__________

Example twenty-seven – Same story, six days later.

Same story - 6 days laterExample twenty-eight – Same story, five days later.

Same story - 5 days later

Example twenty-nine – Same story – three months later.

Same story - 3 months later

Example thirty – Same story – seven days later.

Same story - 7 days later

Example thirty-one – Same story – five days later.

Example thirty-one

Web Site Advertising Placement

May 28, 2013

When placing an advertisement for real estate on a Web page, it’s a good idea not to put it in proximity to a news story showing the devastation caused by recent tornadoes.   It just doesn’t look right.

Open House Advertisement

More Linux Snobbery

May 11, 2013

A recent comments thread posted on Linux news site is an excellent real-world example of more Linux snobbery.

Linux snob example

The original poster, fatih, asked a legitimate question.  Someone calling themselves Courage responded with, “STFW” (search the f***ing Web).

This type of response makes Linux users look rude, crude, and uncaring.  Courage’s reply was extremely inappropriate and wholly unnecessary.  Fortunately, another poster called mexsudo rectified the situation by posting a link to the information fatih very politely requested.

Windows, Linux, Apple

February 2, 2013

Windows is for most users.

Linux is for the true geeks.

Apple is for those with more money than brains.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.